Thats Great Advice: Advice from Pro Athletes for Kids, Written by a Kid

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Leave the coaching to the coaches. Write down your goals for your child for this season. Talk to your child about these goals, as they likely are not the same as his or hers!

Thats Great Advice: Advice from Pro Athletes for Kids, Written by a Kid

When setting goals with your child, remember to focus on both effort and outcome related goals. For example, a great effort goal in basketball is praising a player for their consistent effort to box out. There are a lot of basketball organizations out there.

Take the time to evaluate options for where your child might play. Talk to other parents whose kids have played in those organizations.


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Resist the temptation to critique your child on the way home. Ask if your child wants to talk about the game.

Pediatric Care | Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

I need to be at opening day. So, earlier this week, when The Nationals my team—Go Nats!

The Washington Post covered it, but other publications that mentioned it simply listed it as a basic change in the line-up. The lack of hoopla is, in some ways, a good thing.

Not Making the Grade

It demonstrates the slow but steady normalization of paternity leave and, as Grosse noted in her article, the evolution of our national perception of the role of fathers. On the other hand, the importance of paid paternity and maternity leave and the overall importance of equalizing the role fathers play in parenting and women play in the workforce need as much attention as they can get.

Think of the backlash Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer received when she announced that her maternity leave would just be a few weeks long. If an expecting mother came out and announced that taking a few weeks off for the birth of her child would impact her performance, it would be headline news. All of this is part of a larger issue, though, about the role of sports in the media, pop culture, and our national discussion about gender and equality.